March 2019

"If you're told your entire life that only rich white kids are allowed admission into schools like Harvard, Yale and Princeton, this message will become deeply ingrained within you," Germain said. "What makes this reality even more disheartening is the fact that it is often our own communities and our peers that reinforce these ideas." -Franck Germain

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march 2019

Gabriella Carter, a freshman at Princeton University, will be speaking to the students once they arrive on her campus. Carter says she wishes she could have been involved with something like this when she was looking for colleges. "I think actually going to go tour colleges can change your entire perspective on it," Carter said. "It makes college seem less like some far-fetched phenomena." -Gabriella Carter

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March 2019

Many minority students don’t think beyond state schools and historically Black colleges and universities, Champion said, because the cost and academic standards at Ivy League schools can be intimidating. -Leila Champion

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January 2019

"I found that black and brown students are less likely to apply to ivy league institutions," Champion said. "They feel inadequate because they don’t have the test scores, or they don’t know people who look like them, who go there." -Leila Champion

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January 2019

She says traditionally minority students haven't been encouraged to apply to Ivy League schools. "Since nobody else is going to do it, I'm going to do it. I'm going to be the one who shows these students this is possible. These reach schools are attainable." -Leila Champion

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May 2017

“When high-achieving students from low-income families are admitted to selective institutions, the vast majority thrive, earning high grades and graduating at rates at least equal to their wealthier peers. The key to getting more of these amazing low-income students into selective colleges is recruiting them, guiding them through the application process, reviewing their applications (taking into account the distance they have already traveled to get there), and then supporting them both financially and emotionally. We are keeping far too many bright but poor young people out of our most prestigious colleges. Doing so betrays our fundamental values that those who are ambitious, work hard and play by the rules can achieve upward social mobility and financial success.” -Jennifer Glynn

Jack Kent Cooke Foundation / Read Full Article